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Actividades en Metropolitan City of Rome

Las mejores recomendaciones de las personas del lugar

Desde lugares emblemáticos hasta rincones especiales escondidos, descubre qué hace única a la ciudad con la ayuda de la gente local que mejor la conoce.
Entertainment
“Piazza Venezia The current look of Piazza Venezia is the result of demolition and reconstruction works begun at the end of the 1800s and ending in the early 1900s. Standing out more than anything else is the Vittoriano, mammoth and controversial monument to Victor Emmanuel II. Here we find the Altar to the Fatherland that holds the remains of the Unknown Soldier, in memory of all the fallen soldiers that never received a proper burial. An ancient quarter filled with Renaissance and medieval buildings was demolished to make way for it and the Palazzetto Venezia, that originally closed the piazza, was dismantled and reassembled next to Palazzo Venezia, where it can be found today. At the center of the Vittoriano rises the bronze monument of the king seated astride a horse: it is so huge that, when the works were completed, a banquet was held inside the horses stomach! The Vittoriano is 81 meters high and the chariots at its summit are visible from most of Rome. The construction of the edifice caused much controversy among art critics, so much so that writers and journalists gave it names like “the wedding cake” or “the typewriter”. On the long side of the piazza, Palazzo Venezia, with its imposing facade, was initially the headquarters for popes but during the fascist era, Mussolini used it as the regime's main palace, with its balcony, sadly famous for being the place from which war was announced”
  • Recomendado por 84 personas locales
Soccer Stadium
“Ok, we're still getting over the idea that Francesco Totti will not be playing for AS Roma anymore, but - if you like the atmosphere of a raucous and inflamed stadium - it's worth dropping by on match day to watch the gladiators in action.”
  • Recomendado por 137 personas locales
Oficina
“Zoomarine is the amusement and water park located in Torvaianica, just a few kilometers from Rome”
  • Recomendado por 72 personas locales
Tienda de postres
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“-Best tiramisu of Rome , you can find the traditional with coffee or other tastes with pistachio, banana and nutella, nuts and strawberry and cream; - Sunday brunch; - Apertif in the evening from 7.00 p.m”
  • Recomendado por 174 personas locales
Landmark
“Together with Monte Mario and Pincio it is one of the most panoramic places in the city.”
  • Recomendado por 109 personas locales
Parque
“A walk in the countryside of Rome, in the midst of large meadows, ancient Roman remains, small streams and flocks of sheep grazing. A great way to take a breath from the hardships of tourism, right? Just take a bus and you're in the middle of nature.”
  • Recomendado por 109 personas locales
Pastelería
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“Great place to buy cakes, savoury appetizers, to have breakfast, a pause or aperitivo ”
  • Recomendado por 133 personas locales
Vecindario
“Monti is a very trendy place to hangout either day or night! Great food and drinks. I love this part of Rome. There's also pubs (if you like), a main piazza where everyone, local and/or expats hang around to meet new people.. This is my favourite place for night life in Rome. ”
  • Recomendado por 143 personas locales
Plaza
“In this market you can find the best vegetables and fruit. It is also very picturesque. It is open from 8.00am until 4.30pm ”
  • Recomendado por 113 personas locales
Iglesia
“Pro tip: try to get the last tour of the day. Its always gonna be crowded, but not quite as much at night. Maybe this is because everywhere you read says to go super early? One ticket gets you access to the entire Vatican Museum, with the Sistine Chapel being the final room of the experience. €16 adults, €8 for children or students. Open Mon-Sat 9am - 6pm. Also open the last Sunday of each month, with free admission that day. The line will be extremely long however so use caution!”
  • Recomendado por 98 personas locales
Parque
“Park built on the ancient house of Nerone (DOMUS AUREA), wonderful view and perfect place for walks and photographs, wonderful view!!!”
  • Recomendado por 74 personas locales
Parque
“The park is named after the aqueducts that go through it. It is crossed on one side by the Aqua Felix and also contains part of the Aqua Claudia and the remains of Villa delle Vignacce to the North West. A short stretch of the original Roman Via Latina can also be seen. The park is served by the subway stations Lucio Sestio and Giulio Agricola (line A).”
  • Recomendado por 114 personas locales
Sitio histórico
“Circus Maximus What visitors see today is a large oblong field that modern-day Romans go for walks in. But Circus Maximus today is not so very different to what the ancient Romans saw when they first started to use this small valley between two of Rome’s hills, the Palatine and the Aventine, for sports. People sat on the ground on the slopes to watch sporting events. The shape and structure of the Circus Maximus changed as fast as Rome grew and with the importance of chariot racing, one of the great Roman passions. But what was Circus Maximus like then? Well, actually we don’t know. The first building, built in the VII century B.C. by Tarquinius Priscus was made of wood, but in its moment of splendour, Circus Maximus would have completely been covered in marble and travertine stone; in the centre of the track were two large Egyptian obelisks, one of which, from the time of Ramses II, can now be found in Piazza del Popolo, the other from the reign of Thutmosis III from Thebes, in Piazza S. Giovanni in Laterano. Circus Maximus is the biggest sports stadium ever built. Just think it could hold almost three hundred and eighty thousand visitors with free access to races. Almost four times bigger than the biggest stadium today, an incredible number. Its structures couldn’t have been much different from our horse racing tracks. Imagine watching a chariot race surrounded by the cheering and clapping of thousands of people, betting huge fortunes on the races, eating, arguing and cheering their champions on just like modern fans. Excitement, risk and tension were vital ingredients of the race. Four teams (the factions) took part in each race, each with an identifying colour; they were so popular and important that they ended up becoming actual political parties. Classical races were those with the drivers, called “charioteers”, were hired and sold to other teams for sums much like those spent today to buy sports champions. Prizes were magnificent. Diocles, the greatest Roman charioteer, stopped racing when his riches amounted to the equivalent of 7 million euros today. The most important races took place during the Roman Games, from 4 to 18 September. The excited crowd was stimulated by organizers using different tactics, of which the most original was small parcels full of sweets, money or presents showered down on the crowd. The historian Suetonius even mentions presents like: houses, farms, ships, not so different to what we see in so many of our television programmes today. Races went from morning till night, up to a hundred a day. Each lasted seven laps indicated by a mechanical counter placed in the centre of the track which, as each chariot drove by, raised large wooden eggs or bronze dolphins (a symbol of the horse protecting Gods). But Circus Maximus was not just for races: Caesar simulated a battle with about one thousand foot-soldiers, six hundred cavalry and forty elephants. To add variety to events, during the intervals between races they put on acrobatics or fights between exotic animals. The races were really dangerous, often bloody, anything was allowed. Crashes between chariots were normal. Chronicles of the day tell of violent, often fatal crashes, and give the names of the young charioteers who died in the ruins of their chariots. But it was not just the race that was dangerous. Over-excited Emperors like Vitellius or Caracalla could have a team killed just because it threatened the victory of their favourites or because it had disappointed them. Watching a race at Circus Maximus was not just dangerous for athletes, but for spectators too. Lots of stories tell of fatal accidents involving the audience. During one race a herd of elephants knocked down an iron fence and injured many people. It was a regular occurrence for a chariot to lose control and crash into the public, with dramatic results. Going to the circus was also an important social event. The poet Ovid in his famous manual on the art of love said that the circus was the best place for lovers to meet. He said that race fever combined with the elegant flirtatiousness of women’s clothing helped erotic meetings. And as often happened next to arenas and stadiums, Circus Maximus had its fair share of places where the Romans enjoyed pleasures of varying kinds, such as taverns or brothels. Over the centuries, Circus Maximus was damaged by fire several times. It is well known that the famous fire of Rome (the one that legend says was started by Nero) began on one of the short sides of the Circus (the one where we can now still see the brick remains), but after each fire Circus Maximus was repaired, rebuilt and even enlarged straight away. The last games were organised around 549 A.D. In the Middle Ages it became a fortified area as the small Frangipane tower shows. Then, due to the urban decentralization suffered by the area, Circus Maximus fell into disuse and slowly began to fall apart due to the stealing of marble and stone and the progressive sinking into the ground that still covers a large part of the building today. Circus Maximus has again become popular with young people, thanks to events such as concerts and shows, sometimes with internationally famous artists. So, two thousand seven hundred years later, tradition lives on.”
  • Recomendado por 98 personas locales
Museo de arte
“THE IMPORTANT AND BEAUTIFUL BASILIC OF S. PETER, S. PETER - MICHELANGELO DOME, THE COLONNADE, THE OBELUSK AND S.PETER SQUARE .”
  • Recomendado por 94 personas locales
Iglesia
“The church of San Pietro in Vincoli (St. Peter in Chains) is named for the chains that held St. Peter when he was imprisoned in Rome and in Jerusalem. Best known for the statue of Michelangelo's Mosé”
  • Recomendado por 107 personas locales
Landmark
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“Old Rome was here. Imagine what it was like walking around Rome 2000 years ago. Don't forget the Palatine hill, its museum and a great villa located nearby that was once owned by a Scottsman who loved Rome.”
  • Recomendado por 97 personas locales