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Descubre Kyoto

Landmark
“Nijo Castle (二条城, Nijōjō) was built in 1603 as the Kyoto residence of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shogun of the Edo Period (1603-1867). His grandson Iemitsu completed the castle's palace buildings 23 years later and further expanded the castle by adding a five story castle keep. After the Tokugawa Shogunate fell in 1867, Nijo Castle was used as an imperial palace for a while before being donated to the city and opened up to the public as a historic site. Its palace buildings are arguably the best surviving examples of castle palace architecture of Japan's feudal era, and the castle was designated a UNESCO world heritage site in 1994. Nijo Castle can be divided into three areas: the Honmaru (main circle of defense), the Ninomaru (secondary circle of defense) and some gardens that encircle the Honmaru and Ninomaru. The entire castle grounds and the Honmaru are surrounded by stone walls and moats.”
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Buddhist Temple
“Here is Kiyomizu Temple. One of the best and largest traditional Buddhist temple. Very crowded with tourists and students on busy season. Must see. The structure is massive! You can enjoy wearing Kimono Japanese Traditional Dress from young to adult and walk around take some photos as a good memory. You can go on foot. It will take you 44 minutes!”
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Buddhist Temple
“Here's Kinkakuji Temple which is called The golden Pavilion. Covered in glittering gold leaf, the pavilion dazzles admirers as it shimmers in the sunlight over its mirroring pond. Both the temple and its delightful Zen stroll garden are a must visit location for any visitor to Kyoto. You can visit Kinkakuji for 30 min by bus from Unagi Inn”
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Shrine
“Fushimi Inari Shrine (伏見稲荷大社, Fushimi Inari Taisha) is an important Shinto shrine in southern Kyoto. It is famous for its thousands of vermilion torii gates, which straddle a network of trails behind its main buildings. The trails lead into the wooded forest of the sacred Mount Inari, which stands at 233 meters and belongs to the shrine grounds. Fushimi Inari is the most important of several thousands of shrines dedicated to Inari, the Shinto god of rice. Foxes are thought to be Inari's messengers, resulting in many fox statues across the shrine grounds. Fushimi Inari Shrine has ancient origins, predating the capital's move to Kyoto in 794.”
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Palace
“Kyoto's Imperial Palace used to be the residence of Japan's Imperial Family. The Kyoto Imperial Park, which surround the palace, is a great place to have a relaxing time. Open all day long, locals like to come to run, walk or just sit on a bench and read a book. Distance: 10 minutes' walk Entrance fee: free”
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Shrine
“Yasaka Shrine (Yasaka Jinja), also known as Gion Shrine, is one of the most famous shrines in Kyoto. Founded over 1350 years ago, the shrine is located between the popular Gion District and Higashiyama District, and is often visited by tourists walking between the two districts. From Unagi Inn, you can get to Yasaka shrine for 30 min on foot”
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Museo de arte
“Kyoto Manga Museum is a good place for manga lovers. You can read manga (mainly in Japanese) all day long! Distance: 7 minutes' walk Entrance fee: - Adults: 800JPY - Junion High-High School students: 300JPY - Children: 100JPY Opening hours: 10:00~18:00 (closed on Wednesday)”
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Souvenir Shop
“This is a very famous aquarium in this area. The grass as I look up, we can see so many kinds of fish. These makes not only your eyes but also your mind so happy. ”
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Centro comercial
“The Expo’70 Commemorative Park is about 260 Hectares. In the huge park, there are a part of facilities of the Expo’70, such as the Japanese Garden and the Japan Folk Crafts Museum, Osaka. Parking lots at that time were converted into sporting facilities and recreation spots. The site of theme pavilions is forests and seasonal flower gardens now. The park is known as a cultural park embracing natural environment. You can relax in the park. The park has five areas; the Japanese Garden, the Natural and Cultural Gardens, cultural institution area, sports and recreation area, and parking area.”
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Place of Worship
“The Byōdō-in Temple, established in AD 988, boasts many unique buildings, shrines, and artworks worthy of a visit.”
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Mercado
“Nishiki Market (錦市場, Nishiki Ichiba) is a narrow, five block long shopping street lined by more than one hundred shops and restaurants. Known as "Kyoto's Kitchen", this lively retail market specializes in all things food related, like fresh seafood, produce, knives and cookware, and is a great place to find seasonal foods and Kyoto specialties, such as Japanese sweets, pickles, dried seafood and sushi. Nishiki Market has a pleasant but busy atmosphere that is inviting to those who want to explore the variety of culinary delights that Kyoto is famous for. The stores found throughout the market range in size from small narrow stalls to larger two story shops. Most specialize in a particular type of food, and almost everything sold at the market is locally produced and procured.”
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Buddhist Temple
“Ginkakuji (銀閣寺, Silver Pavilion) is a Zen temple along Kyoto's eastern mountains (Higashiyama). In 1482, shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa built his retirement villa on the grounds of today's temple, modeling it after Kinkakuji (Golden Pavilion), his grandfather's retirement villa at the base of Kyoto's northern mountains (Kitayama). The villa was converted into a Zen temple after Yoshimasa's death in 1490. As the retirement villa of an art obsessed shogun, Ginkakuji became a center of contemporary culture, known as the Higashiyama Culture in contrast to the Kitayama Culture of his grandfather's times. Unlike the Kitayama Culture, which remained limited to the aristocratic circles of Kyoto, the Higashiyama Culture had a broad impact on the entire country. The arts developed and refined during the time include the tea ceremony, flower arrangement, noh theater, poetry, garden design and architecture. Today, Ginkakuji consists of the Silver Pavilion, half a dozen other temple buildings, a beautiful moss garden and a unique dry sand garden. It is enjoyed by walking along a circular route around its grounds, from which the gardens and buildings can be viewed.”
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Shrine
“Fushimi Inari(伏見稲荷大社)" Shrine is a popular spot for foreign tourists.The scenery that countless torii lined is magnificent.”
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Buddhist Temple
“Great historical temple nearby. The tallest wooden pagoda (54.8 meters) in Japan! On the 21st of each month a famous flea market is held on the grounds of Tō-ji.”
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Buddhist Temple
“The Sanjūsangendō sis known for its impressive collection of Buddhist statues. There you can have a good introduction to Buddhist deities as the whole gods are represented in a long wooden buildings made of 33 intervals (hence the name of the building itself).”
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Shrine
“Heian Shrine (Heian Jingu in Japanese) is one of the most famous Shinto shrines in the city. Located in a beautiful part of Kyoto where you also find the Museum of Art, the zoo and Okazaki Park, all a few meters apart from each other. Only a 5 to 7-min walk from our KYOBU-Higashiyama house and Hotel MATERIAL.”
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